Did Google reverse-engineer Windows?

Peter Bright writes:

Since its release a few weeks ago, curious developers have been sniffing through the source code for Google’s new Chrome web browser. Chrome’s source is interesting for a variety of reasons: there’s the new V8 JavaScript virtual machine with its boasts of near-native code performance, the WebKit rendering engine that does all the hard work of understanding and displaying web pages, and (last but not least), Chrome’s secure sandbox designed to minimize the impact of any security flaws that might exist in both the browser and plugins alike. It is this secure sandbox that has piqued the curiosity of some observers, and for a reason that many may find surprising. From reading the source, it looks as though Google has reverse-engineered Windows, and that’s explicitly prohibited by the Windows EULA.

But before looking at the question of disassembly, it’s worth taking a look at how Chrome is put together and at why its security architecture is interesting.

Continue reading at ars technica

Will Chrome Kill Operating Systems?

Charlie White at DVICE writes:

Someday soon, you may not even notice which operating system your computer is using. That broadband-connected machine may not have an operating system on board at all, at least not like Windows and Mac OS X are today. That’s because there’s a new kid on the block, but he’s not even on your block at all, but storing your data and running applications based somewhere else, out there, on the Internet — or as it’s more commonly referred to, “in the cloud.”

Continue reading | photo by jmarty

Ars Technica Reviews Google Chrome Browser

“Google launched its first foray into the browser wars today with the official release of Chrome, a new open source web browser that aims to push forward Internet innovation and elevate user expectations. Although Chrome is still a bit light on features, it is surprisingly polished and has an assortment of highly promising capabilities that could influence the future of browser design.”

Continue reading at Ars Technica

Marshall Kirkpatrick Wonders about Google Chrome TOS

Marshall Kirkpatrick writes:

“one thing we hadn’t noticed until this evening was a curious section of the Chrome Terms of Service.”

“The terms include a section giving Google “a perpetual, irrevocable, worldwide, royalty-free, and non-exclusive license to reproduce, adapt, modify, translate, publish, publicly perform, publicly display and distribute any Content which you submit, post or display on or through, the Services.” That seems pretty extreme for a browser, doesn’t it?”

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